Twitter

12/05/21

We loved our parachute games at lunchtime today 💕 https://t.co/0ZX8UOwh1j

19/04/21

Year 5 have made some brilliant bird boxes for their Easter DT project! https://t.co/OTnL2qr68O

12/03/21

A massive thank you to and for "visiting" HFSP this week - nothing beats meeting and talking to an author about their experiences to inspire our own reading and writing! https://t.co/wxpMcXarDp

12/03/21

Happy belated World Book Day 2021 from HFSP! (2/2) https://t.co/NnfG3CrVsY

12/03/21

Happy belated World Book Day 2021 from HFSP! (1/2) https://t.co/VFrWSeGqtx

08/03/21

Year 4 Meet the Author - Jenny Pearson 📚 https://t.co/ikLIwiepkm

08/03/21

Welcome back KS2 👨‍💻 ✍️ 😃 https://t.co/Lm5DMBMyqO

08/03/21

Welcome back Key Stage 1 📚 🧮 https://t.co/oDlDLZPaEW

08/03/21

Welcome back Early Years 🦕 🦖 https://t.co/rd1NtggzjU

04/03/21

Happy world book day! Look at our amazing crayons 🖍 📚 https://t.co/W8S4WayFsf

26/02/21

The final push! One-to-one Phonics tutoring for our pupils learning online. https://t.co/b9rHt8oB7E

24/02/21

How does a holiday to Mount Etna sound? Year 4 learning about volcanoes in Geography. https://t.co/tCHRatC5lP

12/02/21

Year 4 carrying out a Science experiment learning about the harmful effects certain liquids can have on our teeth. science https://t.co/iD2jilnPSD

11/02/21

Porridge making in Agra Deedy https://t.co/BXTSyBaVV2

11/02/21

Reception are getting ready for Chinese New Year 🧧 🍜 https://t.co/z8vdxN7VxF

11/02/21

Securing those number bonds 🧮 https://t.co/4AG0r09qt2

09/02/21

Key Stage One took part in their Speech Bubbles session today. Children from home and from school participated 🙂 https://t.co/WbiYu9W07X

01/02/21

Year 4 have created their very own Roman God Trump cards this week! Who’s the strongest? 💪 https://t.co/qQVrim5pRn

22/01/21

Year 4 have created some fantastic diagrams of the digestive system for Science! https://t.co/2hUQr0PnuR

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Year 6

Year 6 Curriculum Overview

Term

Content

Half-Term 1

Half-Term 2

Aut

Literary Themes

Migration and Movement

Evolution and Inheritance

Texts

The Arrival* by Shaun Tan

The Unforgotten Coat* by Frank Cottrell Boyce

The Promise by Nicola Davies and Laura Davies

Can We Save the Tiger? by Martin Jekins and Vicky White

Genres and Outcomes

Letters, list of rules, character descriptions, diaries, short playscripts, short report, guides, extended own version narrative

Diary entries, explanations (sci experiment), dialogue, non-chronological reports, own version ‘issues and dilemmas’ narrative

Experimentation with figurative language, report, sequel to continue the cyclical story

Letter, explanation, persuasive poster, persuasive speech, simple poem, discussion text

NC Coverage

Vocabulary, Grammar & Punctuation

Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation
- Recognising vocabulary and structures that are appropriate for formal speech and writing, including subjunctive forms
- Using passive verbs to affect the presentation of information in a sentence
- Using expanded noun phrases to convey complicated information concisely
- Using modal verbs or adverbs to indicate degrees of possibility
- Using relative clauses beginning with who, which, where, when, whose, that
- Relative clauses beginning with who, which, where, when, whose, that, or an omitted relative pronoun

 

Writing (Composition)

Writing (composition)
- Selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary and understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning
- Writing narratives, considering how authors have developed characters and settings in what they have read, listened to or seen performed
- In narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action
- Précising longer passages
- Using a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs

 

Vocabulary, Grammar & Punctuation

- Relative clauses beginning with who, which, where, when, whose, that, or an omitted relative pronoun
- How words are related by meaning as synonyms and antonyms [for example, big, large, little]. - Use of the passive to affect the presentation of information in a sentence [for example, I broke the window in the greenhouse versus The window in the greenhouse was broken (by me)]

- Indicating degrees of possibility using adverbs [for example, perhaps, surely] or modal verbs [for example, might, should, will, must]
- Use of commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity
- Use of the colon to introduce a list and use of semi-colons within lists

 

Writing (Composition)

Plan their writing by:
- Write narratives, considering how authors have developed characters and settings in what they have read, listened to or seen performed
Draft and write by:
- Selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning
- In narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action
- Précising longer passages
Evaluate and edit by:
- Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing
- Proof-reading for spelling and punctuation errors

 

Vocabulary, Grammar & Punctuation

- Indicate grammatical and other features by:
- Using commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity in writing
- Using expanded noun phrases to convey complicated information concisely - Using modal verbs or adverbs to indicate degrees of possibility
From (LKS2 for revision and consolidation)
- Using conjunctions, adverbs and prepositions to express time and cause

 

Writing (Composition)

Draft and write by:
- Selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning
- Creating narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action
- Précising longer passages

 

Vocabulary, Grammar & Punctuation

- Verb prefixes [for example, dis–, de–, mis–, over– and re–]
- Relative clauses beginning with who, which, where, when, whose, that, or an omitted relative pronoun
- Indicating degrees of possibility using adverbs [for example, perhaps, surely] or modal verbs [for example, might, should, will, must]
- Devices to build cohesion within a paragraph [for example, then, after that, this, firstly]
- Linking ideas across paragraphs using adverbials of time [for example, later], place [for example, nearby] and number [for example, secondly] or tense choices [for example, he had seen her before]
- Brackets, dashes or commas to indicate parenthesis
- Use of commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity
- The difference between vocabulary typical of informal speech and vocabulary appropriate for formal speech and writing [for example, find out – discover; ask for – request; go in – enter]
- How words are related by meaning as synonyms
- The difference between structures typical of informal speech and structures appropriate for formal speech and writing [for example, the use of question tags: He’s your friend, isn’t he?]
- Linking ideas across paragraphs using a wider range of cohesive devices: repetition of a word or phrase, grammatical connections [for example, the use of adverbials such as on the other hand, in contrast, or as a consequence], and ellipsis
- Layout devices [for example, headings, sub-headings, columns, bullets, or tables, to structure text]

 

Writing (Composition)

Plan their writing by:
- Identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own
- Noting and developing initial ideas, drawing on reading and research where necessary
Draft and write by:
- Selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning
- Précising longer passages
- Using a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs
- Using further organisational and presentational devices to structure text and to guide the reader [for example, headings, bullet points, underlining]
Evaluate and edit by:
- Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing
- Proposing changes to vocabulary, grammar and punctuation to enhance effects and clarify meaning
- Proof-read for spelling and punctuation errors
- Performing their own compositions, using appropriate intonation, volume, and movement so that meaning is clear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spelling Rules and Word List Words

See Attached Overview

 

 

 

Spr

Literary Themes

Enterprise and Activism

Utopia vs. Dystopia

Texts

The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick *book and film

Suffragette: The Battle for Equality* by David Roberts

The Last Wild by Piers Torday

The Three Little Pigs Project by The Guardian *film

Genres and Outcomes

Diary entry, journalistic writing, flashback narrative, speech, discussion, letter, film critique, biography

Formal letters, diary entries, balanced arguments, speeches, short news report, persuasive campaign

Poster, retellings, formal report, character descriptions, diary entries, formal letters, own version dystopian narrative

News report, persuasive speeches, narrative from a particular point of view, interview scripts, diaries, debate, discussion text

NC Coverage

Vocabulary, Grammar & Punctuation

- Use of inverted commas and other punctuation to indicate direct speech [LKS2 Revision]
- Use of the present perfect and progressive forms of verbs instead of the simple past [for example, He has gone out to play contrasted with He went out to play] [KS1/LKS2 Revision] - Verb prefixes [for example, dis–, de–, mis–, over– and re–]

- Relative clauses beginning with who, which, where, when, whose, that, or an omitted relative pronoun
- Indicating degrees of possibility using adverbs [for example, perhaps, surely] or modal verbs [for example, might, should, will, must]

- Brackets, dashes or commas to indicate parenthesis
- Use of the passive to affect the presentation of information in a sentence [for example, I broke the window in the greenhouse versus The window in the greenhouse was broken (by me)]
- The difference between structures typical of informal speech and structures appropriate for formal speech and writing [for example, the use of question tags: He’s your friend, isn’t he? or the use of subjunctive forms such as If I were or Were they to come in some very formal writing and speech]
- Layout devices [for example, headings, sub-headings, columns, bullets, or tables, to structure text]
- Use of the colon to introduce a list and use of semi-colons within lists

 

Writing (Composition)

Plan their writing by:
- Noting and developing initial ideas, drawing on reading and research where necessary Draft and write by:
- Using a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs
Evaluate and edit by:
- Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing
- Ensuring correct subject and verb agreement when using singular and plural, distinguishing between the language of speech and writing and choosing the appropriate register

 

 

Vocabulary, Grammar & Punctuation

- Recognising vocabulary and structures that are appropriate for formal speech and writing, including subjunctive forms
- Relative clauses beginning with who, which, where, when, whose, that, or an omitted relative pronoun
- Indicating degrees of possibility using adverbs [for example, perhaps, surely] or modal verbs [for example, might, should, will, must]
- Devices to build cohesion within a paragraph [for example, then, after that, this, firstly]
- Linking ideas across paragraphs using adverbials of time [for example, later], place [for example, nearby] and number [for example, secondly] or tense choices [for example, he had seen her before]
- Brackets, dashes or commas to indicate parenthesis
- Use of commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity
- The difference between vocabulary typical of informal speech and vocabulary appropriate for formal speech and writing [for example, find out – discover; ask for – request; go in – enter]
- The difference between structures typical of informal speech and structures appropriate for formal speech and writing [for example, the use of question tags: He’s your friend, isn’t he?]
- Linking ideas across paragraphs using a wider range of cohesive devices: repetition of a word or phrase, grammatical connections [for example, the use of adverbials such as on the other hand, in contrast, or as a consequence], and ellipsis

 

Writing (Composition)

- Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing
- Proposing changes to vocabulary, grammar and punctuation to enhance effects and clarify meaning
- Performing their own compositions, using appropriate intonation, volume, and movement so that meaning is clear
- In narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action
- Précising longer passages

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vocabulary, Grammar & Punctuation
-
Use of inverted commas and other punctuation to indicate direct speech [LKS2 Revision]
- Use of the present perfect and progressive forms of verbs instead of the simple past [for example, He has gone out to play contrasted with He went out to play] [KS1/LKS2 Revision]
- Verb prefixes [for example, dis–, de–, mis–, over– and re–]
- Relative clauses beginning with who, which, where, when, whose, that, or an omitted relative pronoun
- Indicating degrees of possibility using adverbs [for example, perhaps, surely] or modal verbs [for example, might, should, will, must]
- Brackets, dashes or commas to indicate parenthesis
- Use of the passive to affect the presentation of information in a sentence [for example, I broke the window in the greenhouse versus The window in the greenhouse was broken (by me)]
- The difference between structures typical of informal speech and structures appropriate for formal speech and writing [for example, the use of question tags: He’s your friend, isn’t he?, or the use of subjunctive forms such as If I were or Were they to come in some very formal writing and speech]
- Layout devices [for example, headings, sub-headings, columns, bullets, or tables, to structure text]
- Use of the semi-colon, colon and dash to mark the boundary between independent clauses [for example, It’s raining; I’m fed up]

 

Writing (Composition)

Writing (composition)
Plan their writing by:
- Noting and developing initial ideas, drawing on reading and research where necessary Draft and write by:
- Using a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs
Evaluate and edit by:
- Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing
- Ensuring correct subject and verb agreement when using singular and plural, distinguishing between the language of speech and writing and choosing the appropriate register

Vocabulary, Grammar & Punctuation

- Devices to build cohesion within a paragraph [for example, then, after that, this, firstly]
- Brackets, dashes or commas to indicate parenthesis
- Use of the passive to affect the presentation of information in a sentence [for example, I broke the window in the greenhouse versus The window in the greenhouse was broken (by me)]

- Layout devices [for example, headings, sub-headings, columns, bullets, or tables, to structure text]
- How hyphens can be used to avoid ambiguity [for example, man eating shark versus man- eating shark, or recover versus re-cover]

 

Writing (Composition)

- Selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning
- Using a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs
- Proposing changes to vocabulary, grammar and punctuation to enhance effects and clarify meaning

- Ensuring the consistent and correct use of tense throughout a piece of writing

 

 Spelling Rules and Word List Words

See Attached Overview

 

 

 

Sum

Literary Themes

Good vs. Bad

Crossing Borders

Texts

Romeo and Juliet William Shakespeare, Helen Street and Charly Cheung *book and film

Grimm Tales for Young and Old by Phillip Pullman

Some Places More Than Others* by Renee Watson

A Beautiful Lie* by Ifran Master

Genres and Outcomes

Diaries, letters, narratives, character descriptions, balanced argument, playscript OR narrative (modern version)

Retellings, diary entries, informal letters, descriptions, persuasive adverts, formal speeches, own version narrative (fairytale)

Letters, diaries, information leaflets, instructions, poetry

Journalistic writing, recounts, discussion texts, new chapter

NC Coverage

 

 

 

 

Vocabulary, Grammar & Punctuation

- Use of the present perfect form of verbs instead of the simple past [for example, He has gone out to play contrasted with He went out to play] (LKS2)
- Expressing time, place and cause using conjunctions [for example, when, before, after, while, so, because], adverbs [for example, then, next, soon, therefore], or prepositions [for example, before, after, during, in, because of] (LKS2)

- Noun phrases expanded by the addition of modifying adjectives, nouns and preposition phrases (e.g. the teacher expanded to: the strict maths teacher with curly hair) (LKS2)
- Fronted adverbials [for example, Later that day, I heard the bad news.] (LKS2)
- Recognising vocabulary and structures that are appropriate for formal speech and writing, including subjunctive forms (UKS2)

- Indicating degrees of possibility using adverbs [for example, perhaps, surely] or modal verbs [for example, might, should, will, must]
- Brackets, dashes or commas to indicate parenthesis

 

Writing (Composition)

- Identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own
- In writing narratives, considering how authors have developed characters and settings in what pupils have read, listened to or seen performed
- Selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning
- In narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action
- Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing
- Proposing changes to vocabulary, grammar and punctuation to enhance effects and clarify meaning
- Performing their own compositions, using appropriate intonation, volume, and movement so that meaning is clear

 

Vocabulary, Grammar & Punctuation

- Indicating degrees of possibility using adverbs [for example, perhaps, surely] or modal verbs [for example, might, should, will, must]
- The difference between structures typical of informal speech and structures appropriate for formal speech and writing [for example, the use of question tags: He’s your friend, isn’t he?, or the use of subjunctive forms such as If I were or Were they to come in some very formal writing and speech]

- Linking ideas across paragraphs using a wider range of cohesive devices: repetition of a word or phrase, grammatical connections [for example, the use of adverbials such as on the other hand, in contrast, or as a consequence], and ellipsis

 

Writing (Composition)

- Identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own
- Noting and developing initial ideas, drawing on reading and research where necessary
- Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing

- Performing their own compositions, using appropriate intonation, volume, and movement so that meaning is clear.

 

Vocabulary, Grammar & Punctuation

- Using expanded noun phrases to convey complicated information concisely

- Using adverbs to indicate degrees of possibility

- Using commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity in writing

- Using semi-colons, colons or dashes to mark boundaries between independent clauses

- Using a colon to introduce a list

 

Writing (Composition)

- Identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own

- Selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning

- Précising longer passages

- Using a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs

- Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing

- Proposing changes to vocabulary, grammar and punctuation to enhance effects and clarify meaning

- Distinguishing between the language of speech and writing and choosing the appropriate register

- Proof-read for spelling and punctuation errors

 

Vocabulary, Grammar & Punctuation

- Devices to build cohesion within a paragraph [for example, then, after that, this, firstly]
- Linking ideas across paragraphs using adverbials of time [for example, later], place [for example, nearby] and number [for example, secondly] or tense choices [for example, he had seen her before]
- The difference between vocabulary typical of informal speech and vocabulary appropriate for formal speech and writing [for example, find out – discover; ask for – request; go in – enter]
- Linking ideas across paragraphs using a wider range of cohesive devices: repetition of a word or phrase, grammatical connections [for example, the use of adverbials such as on the other hand, in contrast, or as a consequence], and ellipsis

 

Writing (Composition)

Plan their writing by:
- Identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own
- Noting and developing initial ideas, drawing on reading and research where necessary
- In writing narratives, considering how authors have developed characters and settings in what pupils have read, listened to or seen performed
Draft and write by:
- Selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning
- In narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action
- Using a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs
Evaluate and edit by:
- Ensuring the consistent and correct use of tense throughout a piece of writing
- Ensuring correct subject and verb agreement when using singular and plural, distinguishing between the language of speech and writing and choosing the appropriate register
- Performing their own compositions, using appropriate intonation, volume, and movement so that meaning is clear.

 

Spelling Rules and Word List Words

See Attached Overview