Twitter

12/05/21

We loved our parachute games at lunchtime today 💕 https://t.co/0ZX8UOwh1j

19/04/21

Year 5 have made some brilliant bird boxes for their Easter DT project! https://t.co/OTnL2qr68O

12/03/21

A massive thank you to and for "visiting" HFSP this week - nothing beats meeting and talking to an author about their experiences to inspire our own reading and writing! https://t.co/wxpMcXarDp

12/03/21

Happy belated World Book Day 2021 from HFSP! (2/2) https://t.co/NnfG3CrVsY

12/03/21

Happy belated World Book Day 2021 from HFSP! (1/2) https://t.co/VFrWSeGqtx

08/03/21

Year 4 Meet the Author - Jenny Pearson 📚 https://t.co/ikLIwiepkm

08/03/21

Welcome back KS2 👨‍💻 ✍️ 😃 https://t.co/Lm5DMBMyqO

08/03/21

Welcome back Key Stage 1 📚 🧮 https://t.co/oDlDLZPaEW

08/03/21

Welcome back Early Years 🦕 🦖 https://t.co/rd1NtggzjU

04/03/21

Happy world book day! Look at our amazing crayons 🖍 📚 https://t.co/W8S4WayFsf

26/02/21

The final push! One-to-one Phonics tutoring for our pupils learning online. https://t.co/b9rHt8oB7E

24/02/21

How does a holiday to Mount Etna sound? Year 4 learning about volcanoes in Geography. https://t.co/tCHRatC5lP

12/02/21

Year 4 carrying out a Science experiment learning about the harmful effects certain liquids can have on our teeth. science https://t.co/iD2jilnPSD

11/02/21

Porridge making in Agra Deedy https://t.co/BXTSyBaVV2

11/02/21

Reception are getting ready for Chinese New Year 🧧 🍜 https://t.co/z8vdxN7VxF

11/02/21

Securing those number bonds 🧮 https://t.co/4AG0r09qt2

09/02/21

Key Stage One took part in their Speech Bubbles session today. Children from home and from school participated 🙂 https://t.co/WbiYu9W07X

01/02/21

Year 4 have created their very own Roman God Trump cards this week! Who’s the strongest? 💪 https://t.co/qQVrim5pRn

22/01/21

Year 4 have created some fantastic diagrams of the digestive system for Science! https://t.co/2hUQr0PnuR

Harris Academies
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Year 5

Year 5 Curriculum Overview

Term

Content

Half-Term 1

Half-Term 2

Aut

Literary Themes

Ambition and Desire

Power vs. Principle

Texts

The Man Who Walked Between the Towers by Mordicai Gerstein

Robot Girl* by Malorie Blackman and Matthew Griffin

Hidden Figures: The True Story of Four Black Women and the Space Race* by Margot Lee Shetterly and Laura Freeman

The Tempest by William Shakespeare, Helen Street and Charly Cheung

Genres and Outcomes

Information writing (Wikipedia page), letters of advice (formal), writing in role, interviews, news report, persuasive speeches, biography/ autobiography

Discussion, debate, dialogue, character comparisons, review, science-fiction narrative

Non-chronological Reports, formal persuasive letter, informal letter, diary entry, character descriptions, newspaper report (opinion piece), Memoir of Dorothy Vaughan

Setting description, character descriptions /comparisons, diary entry, dialogue, playscript

NC Coverage

Vocabulary, Grammar & Punctuation

Develop their understanding of the concepts set out in English Appendix 2 by:
-Recognising vocabulary and structures that are appropriate for formal speech and writing, including subjunctive forms
-Using passive verbs to affect the presentation of information in a sentence
-Using expanded noun phrases to convey complicated information concisely
- Relative clauses beginning with who, which, where, when, whose, that, or an omitted relative pronoun
- Indicating degrees of possibility using adverbs [for example, perhaps, surely] or modal verbs [for example, might, should, will, must]
- Use of commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity

 

Writing (Composition)

Plan their writing by:
- identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own
- noting and developing initial ideas, drawing on reading and research where necessary
Draft and write by:
- Selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning
- In narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action
Evaluate and edit by:
- Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing
- Proof-reading for spelling and punctuation errors

 

Vocabulary, Grammar & Punctuation

- Relative clauses beginning with who, which, where, when, whose, that, or an omitted relative pronoun
- Indicating degrees of possibility using adverbs [for example, perhaps, surely] or modal verbs [for example, might, should, will, must] - Devices to build cohesion within a paragraph [for example, then, after that, this, firstly]

- Linking ideas across paragraphs using adverbials of time [for example, later], place [for example, nearby] and number [for example, secondly] or tense choices [for example, he had seen her before]
- Brackets, dashes or commas to indicate parenthesis
- Use of commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity

- Use of expanded noun phrases to convey complicated information concisely
- How words are related by meaning as synonyms and antonyms [for example, big, large, little] (Y6)
- The difference between structures typical of informal speech and structures appropriate for formal speech and writing [for example the use of subjunctive forms such as If I were or Were they to come in some very formal writing and speech] (Y6)

 

Writing (Composition)

- Identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own
- In writing narratives, considering how authors have developed characters and settings in what pupils have read, listened to or seen performed
- Selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning
- In narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action
- Précising longer passages
- Using a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs - Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing

- Proposing changes to vocabulary, grammar and punctuation to enhance effects and clarify meaning

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vocabulary, Grammar & Punctuation

Relative clauses beginning with who, which, where, when, whose, that, or an omitted relative pronoun
- Indicating degrees of possibility using adverbs [for example, perhaps, surely] or modal verbs [for example, might, should, will, must]

- Linking ideas across paragraphs using adverbials of time [for example, later], place [for example, nearby] and number [for example, secondly] or tense choices [for example, he had seen her before]
- Brackets, dashes or commas to indicate parenthesis

- Use of commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity
- Use of expanded noun phrases to convey complicated information concisely
- Devices to build cohesion within a paragraph [for example, then, after that, this, firstly]
- How words are related by meaning as synonyms and antonyms [for example, big, large, little] (Y6)
- The difference between structures typical of informal speech and structures appropriate for formal speech and writing [for example the use of subjunctive forms such as If I were or Were they to come in some very formal writing and speech] (Y6)

 

Writing (Composition)

- Identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own
- In writing narratives, considering how authors have developed characters and settings in what pupils have read, listened to or seen performed
- Selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning
- In narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action - Précising longer passages
- Using a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs
- Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing
- Proposing changes to vocabulary, grammar and punctuation to enhance effects and clarify meaning

 

Vocabulary, Grammar & Punctuation

- Use of the present perfect form of verbs instead of the simple past [for example, He has gone out to play contrasted with He went out to play] (LKS2)
- Expressing time, place and cause using conjunctions [for example, when, before, after, while, so, because], adverbs [for example, then, next, soon, therefore], or prepositions [for example, before, after, during, in, because of] (LKS2)

- Noun phrases expanded by the addition of modifying adjectives, nouns and preposition phrases (e.g. the teacher expanded to: the strict maths teacher with curly hair) (LKS2)
- Fronted adverbials [for example, Later that day, I heard the bad news.] (LKS2)
- Relative clauses beginning with who, which, where, when, whose, that, or an omitted relative pronoun

- Indicating degrees of possibility using adverbs [for example, perhaps, surely] or modal verbs [for example, might, should, will, must]
- Brackets, dashes or commas to indicate parenthesis
- How words are related by meaning as synonyms and antonyms [for example, big, large, little] (Y6)

 

Writing (Composition)

- Identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own
- In writing narratives, considering how authors have developed characters and settings in what pupils have read, listened to or seen performed
- Selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning
- In narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action
- Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing
- Proposing changes to vocabulary, grammar and punctuation to enhance effects and clarify meaning
- Perform their own compositions, using appropriate intonation, volume, and movement so that meaning is clear.

Spelling Rules and Word List Words

See Attached Overview

 

 

 

Spr

Literary Themes

Belonging

Fairytale Endings

Texts

The Lost Thing* by Shaun Tan *book and film

Unspoken* by Henry Cole

The Sleeper and the Spindle* by Neil Gaiman and Chris Riddell

Beowulf by Michael Morpurgo

Genres and Outcomes

Diary entries, formal letters, adverts, character and setting descriptions, non-chronological reports, own version fantasy narrative

Recount in role, letters of advice, descriptive retellings, wanted posters, dialogue, Biography of Harriet Tubman

Warning poster, diary entry, dialogue, estate agent’s description, character description, missing narrative, fairytale reworking (prequel or sequel)

Letter of advice, diary entry, dialogue, character and setting description, action scenes, obituary, missing chapter legend

NC Coverage

Vocabulary, Grammar & Punctuation

- Devices to build cohesion within a paragraph (e.g. then, after that, this, firstly)
- The difference between vocabulary typical of informal speech and vocabulary appropriate for formal speech and writing (e.g. find out – discover; ask for – request; go in – enter)
- Indicating degrees of possibility using adverbs [for example, perhaps, surely] or modal verbs [for example, might, should, will, must]
- The use of subjunctive forms such as If I were or Were they to come in some very formal writing and speech]
- Relative clauses beginning with who, which, where, when, whose, that, or an omitted relative pronoun
- Linking ideas across paragraphs using a wider range of cohesive devices: repetition of a word or phrase, grammatical connections, e.g. adverbials
- Use of inverted commas and other punctuation to indicate direct speech e.g. a comma after the reporting clause; end punctuation within inverted commas (e.g. The conductor shouted, “Sit down!”
- Layout devices [for example, headings, sub-headings, columns, bullets, or tables, to structure text]

 

Writing (Composition)

Plan their writing by:
- Identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own
- Noting and developing initial ideas, drawing on reading and research where necessary
- In writing narratives, considering how authors have developed characters and settings in what they have read, listened to or seen performed
Draft and write by:
- In narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action
- Using a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs
- Using further organisational and presentational devices to structure text
Evaluate and edit by:
- Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing

 

Vocabulary, Grammar & Punctuation

Develop their understanding of the concepts set out in English Appendix 2 by:
-Recognising vocabulary and structures that are appropriate for formal speech and writing, including subjunctive forms
-Using passive verbs to affect the presentation of information in a sentence
-Using expanded noun phrases to convey complicated information concisely
- Relative clauses beginning with who, which, where, when, whose, that, or an omitted relative pronoun
- Indicating degrees of possibility using adverbs [for example, perhaps, surely] or modal verbs [for example, might, should, will, must]
- Use of commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity

 

Writing (Composition)

Plan their writing by:
- identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own
- noting and developing initial ideas, drawing on reading and research where necessary
Draft and write by:
- Selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning
- In narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action
Evaluate and edit by:
- Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing
- Proof-reading for spelling and punctuation errors

 

Vocabulary, Grammar & Punctuation

- Relative clauses beginning with who, which, where, when, whose, that, or an omitted relative pronoun
- Indicating degrees of possibility using adverbs [for example, perhaps, surely] or modal verbs [for example, might, should, will, must]

- Devices to build cohesion within a paragraph [for example, then, after that, this, firstly]
- Linking ideas across paragraphs using adverbials of time [for example, later], place [for example, nearby] and number [for example, secondly] or tense choices [for example, he had seen her before]
- Brackets, dashes or commas to indicate parenthesis
- Use of commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity
- Use of expanded noun phrases to convey complicated information concisely
- How words are related by meaning as synonyms and antonyms [for example, big, large, little] (Y6)
- The difference between structures typical of informal speech and structures appropriate for formal speech and writing [for example the use of subjunctive forms such as If I were or Were they to come in some very formal writing and speech] (Y6)

 

Writing (Composition)

- Identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own
- In writing narratives, considering how authors have developed characters and settings in what pupils have read, listened to or seen performed
- Selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning
- In narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action - Précising longer passages
- Using a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs
- Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing
- Proposing changes to vocabulary, grammar and punctuation to enhance effects and clarify meaning

 

Vocabulary, Grammar & Punctuation

Relative clauses beginning with who, which, where, when, whose, that, or an omitted relative pronoun
- Indicating degrees of possibility using adverbs [for example, perhaps, surely] or modal verbs [for example, might, should, will, must]

- Linking ideas across paragraphs using adverbials of time [for example, later], place [for example, nearby] and number [for example, secondly] or tense choices [for example, he had seen her before]
- Brackets, dashes or commas to indicate parenthesis

- Use of commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity
- Use of expanded noun phrases to convey complicated information concisely
- Devices to build cohesion within a paragraph [for example, then, after that, this, firstly]
- How words are related by meaning as synonyms and antonyms [for example, big, large, little] (Y6)
- The difference between structures typical of informal speech and structures appropriate for formal speech and writing [for example the use of subjunctive forms such as If I were or Were they to come in some very formal writing and speech] (Y6)

 

Writing (Composition)

- Identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own
- In writing narratives, considering how authors have developed characters and settings in what pupils have read, listened to or seen performed
- Selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning
- In narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action - Précising longer passages
- Using a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs
- Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing
- Proposing changes to vocabulary, grammar and punctuation to enhance effects and clarify meaning

 

 Spelling Rules and Word List Words

See Attached Overview

 

 

 

Sum

Literary Themes

Lessons from History

Future and Past

Texts

Kaspar, Prince of Cats by Michael Morpurgo and Michael Foreman

Anne Frank* by Josephine Poole

High Rise Mysteries* by Sharna Jackson

Firebird by Saviour Pirotta and Catherine Hyde

Genres and Outcomes

Character descriptions, reports, letters, advertising leaflet, balanced report, newspaper report

Letters, short descriptions, extended diary entries, obituary, optional opinion piece, newspaper article

Character description, police report, setting description, newspaper article, dialogue, formal persuasive letter, extended detective narrative

Formal letters, retellings, character descriptions, traditional, fairytale narrative

NC Coverage

 

 

 

 

Vocabulary, Grammar & Punctuation

- Using passive verbs to affect the presentation of information in a sentence
- Using expanded noun phrases to convey complicated information concisely
- Using modal verbs or adverbs to indicate degrees of possibility
- Using commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity in writing
- Linking ideas across paragraphs using a wider range of cohesive devices: repetition of a word or phrase, grammatical connections [for example, the use of adverbials such as on the other hand, in contrast, or as a consequence], and ellipsis
- Layout devices [for example, headings, sub-headings, columns, bullets, or tables, to structure text]
- Punctuation of bullet points to list information

 

Writing (Composition)

- Identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own
- Noting and developing initial ideas, drawing on reading and research where necessary
- Précising longer passages

- Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing - Proof-reading for spelling and punctuation errors

 

 

Vocabulary, Grammar & Punctuation

- Indicating degrees of possibility using adverbs [for example, perhaps, surely] or modal verbs [for example, might, should, will, must]
- Devices to build cohesion within a paragraph [for example, then, after that, this, firstly]
- Linking ideas across paragraphs using adverbials of time [for example, later], place [for example, nearby] and number [for example, secondly] or tense choices [for example, he had seen her before]

- How words are related by meaning as synonyms and antonyms
- The difference between structures typical of informal speech and structures appropriate for formal speech and writing [for example, the use of question tags: He’s your friend, isn’t he?, or the use of subjunctive forms such as If I were or Were they to come in some very formal writing and speech]

 

Writing (Composition)

- Identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own
- Selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning
- In narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action
- Using a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs
- Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing
- Ensuring the consistent and correct use of tense throughout a piece of writing

 

Vocabulary, Grammar & Punctuation

- Relative clauses beginning with who, which, where, when, whose, that, or an omitted relative pronoun
- Indicating degrees of possibility using adverbs [for example, perhaps, surely] or modal verbs [for example, might, should, will, must]
- Linking ideas across paragraphs using adverbials of time [for example, later], place [for example, nearby] and number [for example, secondly] or tense choices [for example, he had seen her before]
- Brackets, dashes or commas to indicate parenthesis
- Use of commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity
- Use of expanded noun phrases to convey complicated information concisely

- Devices to build cohesion within a paragraph [for example, then, after that, this, firstly]
- How words are related by meaning as synonyms and antonyms [for example, big, large, little] (Y6)
- The difference between structures typical of informal speech and structures appropriate for formal speech and writing [for example the use of subjunctive forms such as If I were or Were they to come in some very formal writing and speech] (Y6)

 

Writing (Composition)

- Identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own
- In writing narratives, considering how authors have developed characters and settings in what pupils have read, listened to or seen performed
- Selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning
- In narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action - Précising longer passages
- Using a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs
- Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing
- Proposing changes to vocabulary, grammar and punctuation to enhance effects and clarify meaning

 

Vocabulary, Grammar & Punctuation


- Converting nouns or adjectives into verbs using suffixes [for example, –ate; –ise; –ify]
- Indicating degrees of possibility using adverbs [for example, perhaps, surely] or modal verbs [for example, might, should, will, must]
- Devices to build cohesion within a paragraph [for example, then, after that, this, firstly]
- Linking ideas across paragraphs using adverbials of time [for example, later], place [for example, nearby] and number [for example, secondly] or tense choices [for example, he had seen her before]
- How words are related by meaning as synonyms and antonyms [for example, big, large, little]. - The difference between structures typical of informal speech and structures appropriate for formal speech and writing [for example, the use of question tags: He’s your friend, isn’t he?, or the use of subjunctive forms such as If I were or Were they to come in some very formal writing and speech]

 

Writing (Composition)

- Identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own
- Selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning
- In narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action
- Précising longer passages
- Using a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs
- Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing
- Ensuring the consistent and correct use of tense throughout a piece of writing

 

Spelling Rules and Word List Words

See Attached Overview