Twitter

01/04/20

Retweetd From Microsoft Education

Today and every day, our goal is to support teachers and students wherever their learning journey may lead. Check out this YouTube playlist to explore a collection of tips and tricks helpful for : https://t.co/OB2fEHiz4C https://t.co/JsfOUXz7FI

01/04/20

Retweetd From National Theatre

Not long now! Set a reminder for tomorrow night on our YouTube channel: https://t.co/AIoQ3ytH47 https://t.co/ANsPrcyf1A

01/04/20

Retweetd From NHS Nightingale London

We love that so many of you have shared your amazing rainbow pictures, but please don’t send them in the post. We’re working on a way to receive them, but for now please share using https://t.co/OXSAxNwdck

01/04/20

Retweetd From Rainbows for NHS Nightingale

These are awesome!!!! Not long before they will be up at NHS Nightingale! Thank you for all your support xxxx https://t.co/PD9eOH9CHk

01/04/20

Retweetd From HPAPeckhamPark

Thank you to Rebecca for starting our art in support of the NHS, and to Maria, Laura, Geraldine and other staff for facilitating the children to complete it. https://t.co/jAa8AI1YpS

01/04/20

Retweetd From RuthMiskinedu

Poetry Time film is available to view on YouTube at 2pm. This film will stay on YouTube for you and your child to enjoy (and join in) over and over again. https://t.co/FFUtWkgp7O

01/04/20

Retweetd From RuthMiskinedu

Don't forget to tune into our daily phonics lessons. Subscribe and turn on the notifications to never miss a daily Read Write Inc. Phonics lesson. https://t.co/xZHLYegQyV Speed Sounds Set 1 - 9.30 am (GMT) Speed Sounds Set 2 – 10.00 am Speed Sounds Set 3 – 10.30 am

01/04/20

Retweetd From RuthMiskinedu

We have uploaded a Speed Sounds lesson schedule onto our website. This includes the order of repeated lesson sounds over the Easter holidays. View it on our home reading page: https://t.co/iq1zCsjDx4

01/04/20

Retweetd From HPAPeckhamPark

Check out these online activities 👍🏼 https://t.co/lmlsMa5hkd

01/04/20

💛a small school with a big heart 💜#chasetherainbow 💚 https://t.co/xqDXEBg4KZ

31/03/20

🎸Times Tables Rock Stars login details have been sent to all Y2 - Y6 parents 🎸 https://t.co/XpA8Ztoiyu

31/03/20

📣 Passwords for Year 2, Year 3 and Year 4 Microsoft Teams have been text to all families. 📣 Class teachers will be phoning to check that you are set up ✅ Year 2 - Year 6 lessons will be online after the Easter holiday👨‍💻

30/03/20

This week teachers are learning how to video their lessons 👩‍💻 💻 to support learning next at home next term. Keep the pictures from home coming in! https://t.co/TBTi1aECFb

30/03/20

💫 Amazing photos of learning at home! It is making the teachers very proud - Resilient Learners 💫 https://t.co/wnrNFAv8Nx

27/03/20

Week 2 School Closure Work Packs are uploaded for all year groups https://t.co/CtYwHIqbtS

27/03/20

Retweetd From HPAPeckhamPark

Free audio books for children from Amazon for limited time- so get listening! https://t.co/87u5xWtIiy

27/03/20

Retweetd From HPAPeckhamPark

Free Reading Resource:https://t.co/4iFnkfBDd5

25/03/20

Retweetd From HPAPeckhamPark

Want to know more about wildlife? Click below for a Q&A with Steve Backshaw. https://t.co/OqNuBpJ0Lk

25/03/20

Ideas for science at home https://t.co/AfWZ4odOQX 🌞 🌧 💨

25/03/20

The Maths Factor is free for the duration of the school closure. Have a go at logging on! 🧠 🥉🥈🥇https://t.co/06vQLOUVj2

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Phonics

At Harris Free School Peckham, we use the Read Write Inc. programme to teach phonics.  Below is an explanation of some of the terminology we use when teaching phonics and what it means.  We run phonics workshops for parents throughout the year - check the calendar section of the website to find the date of our next workshop.

Phoneme: the smallest unit of sound that you can hear within a word; the word phoneme refers to the sound, not the letter(s) which represent the sound in writing. For example, in the word gate, there are three phonemes (g-long ay-t); in school there are four (s-c-long ooh-l).

There are 44 phonemes in English, which can be split into two groups:

24 consonant phonemes: for example, ‘b’ (bang, bubble), ‘m’ (monkey, hammer), ‘ch’ (chat, match), ‘ng’ (bang). You can see in the examples that the sounds (the phonemes) can be written in different ways (different graphemes).

20 vowel phonemes: there needs to be at least one vowel sound in every word.
There are short vowel sounds (apple, egg, bread, kit, gym, octopus, wash, umbrella, won), long vowel sounds (such as in rain, tray, tree, me, light, kite) and other vowel sounds (such as book, could, fork, board, chair). As before, the sounds can be written in different ways (different graphemes).

Top tip! When you talk about sounds to your child, use the phonemes (the letter sounds). The reason for this is that sounding out words is practically impossible if you use the letter names: cat doesn’t sound like ‘see-ay-tee’.

Top tip! When saying the sounds of b, d, g, j and w and other letters, you might notice the 'uh' sound which follows each (‘buh’, ‘duh’...). It’s hard to say the sound without it but do try to emphasise the main letter sound and avoid saying the ‘uh’ too much. In some letters, avoid the ‘uh’ completely (say ‘mmm’ rather than ‘muh’ and ‘sss’, not ‘suh). This is to avoid your child spelling a word like cat and wanting to add the ‘uh’ sound (c-u-a-t). 

Grapheme: a grapheme is a ‘symbol’ of a phoneme – it’s a letter or group of letters representing a sound and we use the letter names for this.

A one letter grapheme is the ‘c’ in cat where the hard ‘c’ sound is represented by the letter ‘c’; a two letter grapheme is in leaf where the long ‘ee’ sound is represented by the letters ‘ea’; a four letter grapheme is contained in through where the letters ‘ough’ make the long ‘oo’ sound.

To complicate matters even more, some sounds (phonemes) can be spelled with different graphemes (spellings). For example, the hard ‘c’ sound can be spelled with ‘c’, ‘k’ or ‘ck’ graphemes (as in ‘car’, ‘kite’ and ‘lock’); the long ‘ee’ sound can be spelled with lots of different graphemes, such as ‘ee’ (Leeds), ‘ea’ (beat), ‘ie’ (chief), ‘ei’ (ceiling), ‘e-e’ (theme).

Digraph: is a two letter grapheme, such as ‘ch’, ‘sh’, ‘oa’ (two letters making one sound).

Split digraph: the ‘e’ at the end of words works with another letter to make a sound. Think about the difference between hop and hope – both have three sounds (phonemes), but the split digraph in hope creates and ‘long o’ sound.

Trigraph: a three letter grapheme, where three letters represent one phoneme, as in ear, air, high, pear (three letters making one sound, even in a word like pear where the ‘r’ is not really said).

Top tip! When you talk about sounds to your child, use the phonemes (the letter sounds). Soon, though, it’s a good idea to distinguish this from the letter name; the hard sound ‘c’ can be made using a ‘c’ (a ‘see’) as in cat, a ‘k’ (a ‘kay’) as in kit, or a ‘ck’ (a ‘see-kay’). 

Blending: the merging together of the separate sounds in a word. The separate sounds (phonemes) are spoken in order, all through the word, and are then merged together into the whole word - this is a vital skill for reading. For example, the three phonemes ch-a-t are blended to make chat, whilst th-r-ee blend to make three.

Decode: to read words. 

Segmenting: breaking words down into phonemes to spell (so, the opposite process to blending). The whole word is spoken aloud and then broken up into its sounds (phonemes) in order, all through the word - this is a vital skill for spelling. For example, hearing that leads can be segmented into l-ea-d-s, with the ‘long e’ sound but also possibly represented by ‘ee’ (Leeds) and other possibilities (see the graphemes, above).

Encode: to spell words. 

CVC: a word containing the sequence ‘consonant, vowel, consonant). For example, cat and even chat because the ‘ch’ grapheme works together to make a single sound (phoneme) – you wouldn’t say c-h-a-t).

Tricky words: words like they and said which can’t be sounded