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12/05/21

We loved our parachute games at lunchtime today 💕 https://t.co/0ZX8UOwh1j

19/04/21

Year 5 have made some brilliant bird boxes for their Easter DT project! https://t.co/OTnL2qr68O

12/03/21

A massive thank you to and for "visiting" HFSP this week - nothing beats meeting and talking to an author about their experiences to inspire our own reading and writing! https://t.co/wxpMcXarDp

12/03/21

Happy belated World Book Day 2021 from HFSP! (2/2) https://t.co/NnfG3CrVsY

12/03/21

Happy belated World Book Day 2021 from HFSP! (1/2) https://t.co/VFrWSeGqtx

08/03/21

Year 4 Meet the Author - Jenny Pearson 📚 https://t.co/ikLIwiepkm

08/03/21

Welcome back KS2 👨‍💻 ✍️ 😃 https://t.co/Lm5DMBMyqO

08/03/21

Welcome back Key Stage 1 📚 🧮 https://t.co/oDlDLZPaEW

08/03/21

Welcome back Early Years 🦕 🦖 https://t.co/rd1NtggzjU

04/03/21

Happy world book day! Look at our amazing crayons 🖍 📚 https://t.co/W8S4WayFsf

26/02/21

The final push! One-to-one Phonics tutoring for our pupils learning online. https://t.co/b9rHt8oB7E

24/02/21

How does a holiday to Mount Etna sound? Year 4 learning about volcanoes in Geography. https://t.co/tCHRatC5lP

12/02/21

Year 4 carrying out a Science experiment learning about the harmful effects certain liquids can have on our teeth. science https://t.co/iD2jilnPSD

11/02/21

Porridge making in Agra Deedy https://t.co/BXTSyBaVV2

11/02/21

Reception are getting ready for Chinese New Year 🧧 🍜 https://t.co/z8vdxN7VxF

11/02/21

Securing those number bonds 🧮 https://t.co/4AG0r09qt2

09/02/21

Key Stage One took part in their Speech Bubbles session today. Children from home and from school participated 🙂 https://t.co/WbiYu9W07X

01/02/21

Year 4 have created their very own Roman God Trump cards this week! Who’s the strongest? 💪 https://t.co/qQVrim5pRn

22/01/21

Year 4 have created some fantastic diagrams of the digestive system for Science! https://t.co/2hUQr0PnuR

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Year 5

Year 5 Curriculum Overview

 

Y5 Subject: Autumn 1 Knowledge – How far would a Sikh go for their religion?

Key End-Points:

 

How far would you go to achieve a goal?

  • A goal is the object of a person's ambition or effort
  • It is an aim or desired result
  • Goals help us to clarify what we want to achieve in life
  • Goals only have value if they help to improve ourselves or others potential

What are the key Sikh beliefs?

  • Guru Nanak was the first Sikh Guru; he taught Sikhs to follow five key practices that would help them to be close to God
  • God is in everything
  • It is a Sikh’s duty to serve others
  • All people should be treated as equals
  • Sikhs should share what they can with others
  • Sikhs should earn their living earnestly
  • Sikhs believe in karma, meaning that actions have consequences.
  • Sikhs believe in reincarnation, which means they will be reborn after they die until they are united with God.  

Why do Sikhs travel to the Golden Temple?

  • The Golden temple was built by the fifth Sikh guru, Guru Arjan, in the 16th Century
  • It is the most famous Sikh religious building, known as the gurdwara
  • The Harmandir Sahib (golden temple) means The Temple of God
  • The water surrounding the Golden Temple is believed to be sacred and have healing powers
  • It is where their holiest text is kept, the Guru Granth Sahib

What are the 5 Ks?

  • The 5 Ks are 5 physical artefacts worn by Sikhs who have been initiated into the Khalsa (Sikh faith)
  • Kesh (uncut hair)
  • Kara (a steel bracelet)
  • Kanga (a wooden comb)
  • Kachha/Kachera (cotton underwear)
  • Kirpan (steel sword)
  • The 5 Ks taken together symbolise that the Sikh who wears them has dedicated themselves to a life of devotion and submission to Sikhism

Why do Sikhs put so much effort into their religion?

  • Sikhs believe in Karma and that their efforts in this life will be rewarded in their reincarnation; their final goal is to reunite with God.
  • Sikhs believe it is their duty to serve others
  • Sikhs wear the 5 K’s to symbolise their devotion to God
  • Guru Nanak taught Sikhs that to achieve this goal it is important to work hard at being a good human being and following the key beliefs

What are my commitments in life?

  • A commitment involves dedicating yourself to a cause; commitments often affect our actions
  • We can have commitments to ourselves, commitments to people we know and people we don’t know
  • I can reflect on my own commitments, and how I put them into practice:
  • The goal I am aiming for is...
  • This means I must be committed to...
  • I will show commitment by...
  • Sometimes I may find this hard because...

National Curriculum Expectations:

  • Pupils discover traditional religious practice of Sikhism, noticing similarities to other religions or worldviews
  • Discuss and present thoughtfully their own and others’ views on challenging questions about belonging, meaning, purpose and truth, applying ideas of their own in different forms including reasoning, music, art and poetry

Links to prior learning:

  •  Y4- Why are some places special?

Links to future learning:

  •  Y6- How can I show commitment; understanding religious commitments

Demonstrating Mastery of end-points:

  • Multiple-Choice Quiz
  • Outcome: Piece of extended writing showing knowledge acquired

Lesson & Objective

Key Knowledge & Vocabulary

Explanations/ Representations

Misconceptions

Connections:

Revisit & Foreshadow

Outcomes

1

How far would you go to achieve a goal?

 

 

I can describe what a goal is

 

I can explain a goal personal to me I wish to achieve

  • A goal is the object of a person's ambition or effort
  • It is an aim or desired result
  • Goals help us to clarify what we want to achieve in life
  • Goals only have value if they help to improve ourselves or others potential

 

 

Vocabulary:

 

Commitment

Goal

Achievement

Aspiration

Ambition

Opportunity for a visitor to talk about goals and achievements

Share a range of famous people pupils will relate to/aspire to be.

 

e.g.

Mo Farrah

J.K Rowling

Stormzy

Ronaldo

Usain Bolt

Andy Murray

 

CT: what do you think these people had to do in order to achieve their goals?

 

Explain that a goal is the object of a person’s ambition. It is what we aim for, desire to be or have. They help us to improve ourselves and others.

 

Ask pupils to write down and discuss one goal they have. Share with class.

 

CT: What do you need to do in order to achieve your goal? List activities.

 

Why might it be difficult to commit to this goal?

Discuss how different goals require different levels of commitment- why is this?

 

Introduce to SMART Target

Pupils produced a SMART target and action plan to go with it

Teacher model examples of mood board.

Foreshadow:

How goals can be religious and require a great deal of commitment and discipline in order to achieve them.

Pupils create a SMART target, and a step by step plan to go with it.

 

 

 

2

What are the key Sikh beliefs?

 

I can describe the key beliefs of Sikhism

I can explain the meaning behind these beliefs 

 

 

 

 

  • Guru Nanak was the first Sikh Guru; he taught Sikhs to follow five key practices that would help them to be close to God
  • God is in everything
  • It is a Sikh’s duty to serve others
  • All people should be treated as equals
  • Sikhs should share what they can with others
  • Sikhs should earn their living earnestly
  • Sikhs believe in karma, meaning that actions have consequences.
  • Sikhs believe in reincarnation, which means they will be reborn after they die until they are united with God.  

.

 

Vocabulary:

 

Guru

Langar

Sewa

Karma

Reincarnation

 

Opportunity for visitor for the Sikh Community

 

Read story of Guru Nanak with Children. Pupils answer some questions to test understanding and recall of the story.

 

Lesson:

 

Explain to pupils that Guru Nanak is the founder of Sikhism who proposed a set of beliefs and duties for Sikhs to follow.

 

 

Watch video of ‘Sikh beliefs and worship’. Pupils to jot down anything that Sikhs give/give up for their faith.

 

Explain the five key principles Sikhs follow:

 

  • Live life God centred
  • Serve others
  • Treat everyone equal
  • Share what they can with others
  • Mentally and materially
  • Earn a living honestly

 

Explain that Sikhs believe in Karma and reincarnation. Karma is the actions and consequences of actions in a lifetime. Ask pupils if they have ever heard this word before. Explain that if they have fulfilled the key beliefs, they will receive good Karma, and be reincarnated as something well respected like a human.

May need further explanation of who Guru Nanak was.

 

Recap who Guru Nanak was

 

Create a chart containing the words belief and action.

 

 

Pupils to write the key belief and the action associated to it with an explanation.

 

  1. Living God centred- worshiping in the Gurdwara
  2. Serve others- volunteering in the Gurdwara
  3. Treat everyone equal- Serving Langar to everyone
  4. Sharing with others- donating 1/10 of their money to charity
  5. Earning a living honestly- working hard and not expecting others to complete your work

 

Underneath, pupils to explain the meaning and purpose of these beliefs:

 

‘To receive good Karama in their next life’

 

‘To eventually be reunited with God’

 

3

Why do Sikhs travel to the Golden Temple?

 

 

Explain the key beliefs of Sikhism and how they link to worship

 

I can explain what the Guru Granth Sahib is

 

I can explain what a Gurdwara is and why it is important to Sikhs

The Golden temple was built by the fifth Sikh guru, Guru Arjan

 

It is the most famous Sikh religious building, known as the gurdwara

 

The Harmandir Sahib (golden temple) means The Temple of God

 

The water surrounding the Golden Temple is believed to be sacred and have healing powers

 

It is where their holiest text is kept, the Guru Granth

Sahib 

 

 

Vocabulary:

Pilgrimage,

Golden Temple

Guru Granth Sahib

Harmander Sahib

 

 

 

Lesson

 

Invite pupils to discuss what a ‘special place’ might be to them. Share ideas as whole class.

 

Show pupils image of the Golden temple and where it is in Punjab. Ask pupils to note any key features they can see which might make Sikhs want to travel there.

 

CT: India is a developing country- how might this affect people travelling here, or their purpose for travel?

 

  • It might be a place of worship and something for people to aspire to
  • It might take people a long/expensive time to travel there, and shows its importance

 

Explain that many Sikhs make a pilgrimage to the Harmander Sahib. This is the most famous place of worship for Sikhs because it holds the first Sikh text- the Guru Granth Sahib

 

CT: ‘The temple has doors on each side to show that people can come to God from all corners of the Earth’. Which key belief could this symbolism be associated with?

(Last lesson- treat everyone equal).

 

Explain that Sikhs want to visit the Harmandir Sahib because it helps them to remember the oneness of God and the oneness of humanity.

 

In groups, create a Y chart with the headings:

 

Practices

Beliefs

Historical context

 

Underneath each heading, discuss and complete

 

Beliefs:

  • Sikhs believe the pool of water, which surrounds the Temple is sacred, and has healing powers
  • The temple has four doors to symbolise that anyone can enter regardless of race, religion or gender.

 

Practices:

  • Sikhs pilgrimage here to show respect
  • They perform Sewa here and serve Langar

 

Historical context:

  • -The Golden Temple is also known as the Harmandir Sahib.
  • -It is located in Punjab, which is the birthplace of Sikhism
  • -It holds the very first text of the Guru Granth Sahib (Religious text)

Replicate in books

Ensure pupils have seen map of Punjab and Amritsar to build context.

 

 

Discuss vocabulary in context

Prior links- Christianity and the Holy water found at Lourdes

 

Y4- Special places

Create a Y chart surrounding the Golden temple with the headings:

 

Practices

Beliefs

Historical context

 

 

Detailed response to the question:

 

‘How might the practice of Sewa make someone become a better person?’

4

What are the 5 Ks?

 

I can explain how Sikhs represent their beliefs

 

I can describe the 5 Ks

 

I can explain how they are used in everyday life

The 5 Ks are 5 physical artefacts worn by Sikhs who have been initiated into the Khalsa (Sikh faith)

 

Kesh (uncut hair)

Kara (a steel bracelet)

Kanga (a wooden comb)

Kachha/kachera (cotton underwear)

Kirpan (steel sword)

 

The 5 Ks taken together symbolise that the Sikh who wears them has dedicated themselves to a life of devotion and submission to Sikhism

 

 

Vocabulary:

 

Kesh, Kara, Kanga, Kachha/kachera, Kirpan

Khalsa

 

 

Information for pupils and teachers:

 

1. Kesh- Symbolises a gift from God

 

2. Kara - a steel bracelet

Symbolises God has no beginning and no end

 

3. Kanga - a wooden comb

This symbolises a clean mind and body as since it keeps the uncut hair neat and tidy

 

4. Kachha/kachera – cotton underwear symbolises modesty

 

5. Kirpan – Symbolises defence of the weak or against injustice

 

Lesson:

 

Recap the 5 key Sikh beliefs.

Recap the practice of Karma and reincarnation- how do they link to the 5 Sikh beliefs?

 

CT: What do we do as a school to show that we’re a community? Discuss ideas.

 

  • School uniform
  • Assemblies
  • Mission statement/core values/rules

 

Show images of the 5 K’s to pupils. Give some time for pupils to discuss what they might be/use for, before explanation each one.

 

Watch this video and ask pupils, in groups, to note down how Sikhs show their commitment to Sikhism by practicing the 5 K’s.

 

Explain that the Sikh 5 Ks are like a school uniform. They symbolise the Sikh community.

 

CT: How do the 5K’s link to the five key beliefs? Pupils match up 5K’s to 5 key beliefs and make judgements as to why they link.

 

(5 beliefs)

 

God is in everything

Serve others

Treat everyone equally

Share

Earn honestly

Cotton underwear- discuss historical context of this K. Sikhism was founded in 1699 and this was considered necessary at the time. It is more a symbol of being modest than following an outdated practice.

How do the 5K’s show devotion to God?

Pupils to stick/draw pictures for each of the 5 K’s and respond to questions:

 

 

What it is

What it symbolises

Link to beliefs

 

The Kara is... (a steel bracelet)

It symbolises... (That God has no beginning and no end)

This symbol links to the belief that... (God in everything)

 

5

Why do Sikhs put so much effort into their religion?

 

 

I can explain the beliefs and practices of Sikhism

 

I can make judgements as to which practice demonstrates commitment best

Sikhs believe in Karma and that their efforts in this life will be rewarded upon reincarnation

 

Sikhs believe it is their duty to serve others 

 

Sikhs wear the 5 K’s to symbolise their devotion to God 

 

Sikhs put so much effort into their religion as the final goal of their life is to reunite or merge with God.

 

Guru Nanak taught Sikhs that to achieve this goal it is important to work hard at being a good human being and following the key beliefs 

 

Vocabulary

 

Guru Granth Sahib

Guru Nanak, Gurdwara

Reunite, Humanity

 

 

This is a review lesson. There should be no new learning here.

 

Consolidate all prior learning covered in this sequence. Revisit learning prior to assessment.

 

Explain to pupils that Sikhs practice the 5 beliefs and wear the 5K’s for two reasons:

 

  1. To receive good karma upon reincarnation
  2. To be reunited with God one day

 

Explain that they believe God will stop the cycle of reincarnation and meet when he is happy with their actions.

This means their actions must reflect being a good human being.

 

Create picture cards of the key beliefs/practices taught this sequence.

In groups, pupils rank them in order of least to most effort it would take for a Sikh to show their commitment. 

 

Extended Writing:

Paragraph 1- What is karma? What is reincarnation? Who founded Sikhism?

Paragraph 2- What beliefs do Sikhs have and follow?

Paragraph 3- What are the 5 Ks?

Paragraph 4- Why do Sikhs follow these beliefs and the 5K’s?

Paragraph 5- Which belief/practice would take the most amount of effort?

Ensure concept of reincarnation and karma is understood. Sikhs do not have choice as to what they are reincarnated to.

Foreshadowing- demonstrating commitment in a practical sense.

Pupils to rank key beliefs/practice in order of least to most effort it would take for a Sikh to show their commitment. 

 

Explain why this level of effort is necessary to show their commitment.

 

Pupils to make their own choices as to which belief/practice reflects being a good human being, best.

 

 

I believe the practice of... (serving others) is the best way to reflect being a good human being because it shows that we treat everyone equally. It demonstrates that we do not equate anyone to be beneath us, or to have less worth, regardless of our position in society.

 

MCQ

6

What are my commitments in life?

 

 

I can explain what a commitment is

 

I can reflect on my own commitments, and how I put them into practice

 

 

A commitment involves dedicating yourself to a cause

 

commitments often affect our actions

 

 

We can have commitments to ourselves, commitments to people we know and people we don’t know 

 

 

Vocabulary:

Commitment

Achievement

Mission statement

Resilience

Dedication

Place word commitment on the board and allow pupils a few minutes to discuss its meaning. Can they define it? CT to write definition on working wall.

 

Elicit that a commitment is dedicating to a cause. We show that commitment by doing something regularly, being loyal and working hard.

We all show a commitment to being in this class. We show that commitment by following our class rules.

 

Go back to first lesson in the sequence and look at their main goals in life. Ask pupils to choose one.

 

CT: what commitment do you need to show to achieve this goal?

How are you going to do this?

What might you find difficult?

Pupils need to understand how commitments can be personal, social and traditional to be able to differentiate their own.

What happens when commitments don’t work?  Consider resilience building and how thinks links to faith, both personal and religious. 

Pupils choose a personal goal reflected from L1- SMART targets.

 

Create a short mission statement to reinforce the goal they wish to achieve, and how they show commitment to this.

 

The goal I am aiming for is...

This means I must be committed to...

I will show commitment by...

Sometimes I may find this hard because...